Research is part of the fabric of a Carnegie Mellon education: undergraduates are encouraged to explore new ideas, test hypotheses and share results with the community. Research is work that matters.

Qatar bacteriophage and water purification

Qatar bacteriophage and water purification

A student research project demonstrating how bacteria found in Qatar’s sand can be used to purify water won the Best Project award at Meeting of the Minds 2016, the undergraduate research symposium at CMU-Q.

The research study titled, “Characterizing a Novel Bacillus-like Phage from Qatar’s Sand,” was conducted by biological sciences student, Aya Abd Elaal, under the mentorship of Annette Vincent, assistant teaching professor of biological sciences at Carnegie Mellon in Qatar. The study explores using bacteriophages extracted from Qatar’s sand to disinfect water.

Wireless eruptions: Reprogramming wireless sensor networks

Wireless eruptions: Reprogramming wireless sensor networks

A computer science project took second place in the Best Project category at Meeting of the Minds 2016.

“Wireless Eruptions – Reprogramming Wireless Sensor Networks: Challenges and Approaches,” by Aliaa Essameldin, considered the three expectations of wireless sensor networks: scalability, durability and feasibility. Based on these expectations, she examined the reprogramming systems requirements of efficient communication, complete-retasking, node safety guarantees, energy efficiency and memory efficiency to evaluate the most popular existing reprogramming protocols.

Web accessibility in Qatar

Web accessibility in Qatar

The sixth Undergraduate Conference in Information Systems (UCIS) focused on “Humanizing Information Technology (IT),” and submissions considered the evolving role of IT in all facets of human life.

The Most Promising Research Award went to student Dana Al-Muftah for her paper titled “A Study of Web Accessibility and Related Policy Implications to Qatar.” The study evaluates the accessibility of Qatari websites for those with disabilities and suggests a policy framework to facilitate universal access.